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Old 05-24-2017, 05:21 AM   #21
Tony Done
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Originally Posted by FillmoreNYC View Post
Hoo-fah. The Midrange King.

Which guitar is that? It looks familiar. Some kind of Gibson commenorative?
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Old 05-24-2017, 01:19 PM   #22
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Which guitar is that? It looks familiar. Some kind of Gibson commenorative?
Thats a 1935 Gibson L-C.
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Old 05-25-2017, 11:27 PM   #23
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Thats a 1935 Gibson L-C.
Thanks. I knew I had seen it somewhere before. I play a '33 L-00, so little Gibsons from that era tend to catch my eye.
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Old 05-26-2017, 12:36 AM   #24
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That there's funny.
I think on an electric, the pickups and amp make more difference than the wood.
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Old 05-26-2017, 03:46 PM   #25
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I'm not prepared to say that the choice of wood has ZERO effect on the sound of a guitar. I mean if one wood is significantly more dense than another I'd find it hard to imagine that this would have no effect on how the instrument vibrates - and the resulting tone and natural sustain of the instrument.

However, the more different guitars I've owned the more I've come to believe that a great deal more of the end tone should be credited to the type of construction and design and the components, such as the pickup type, bolt-on vs. set neck, or solid vs. semi-hollow, the type of bridge and nut, or the difference in scale length between one guitar and another.

For example, I'd wager that if you had 2 Strat-style guitars the difference in tone would be more pronounced if they were made from the exact same wood species but one had a bolt-on neck and 25.5" scale length and the other a set neck and 24.75" scale length. Or if you had 2 identical guitars and one had P90s and the other humbuckers, that would make a LOT more difference than if they both had the same pups but one was an Ash body and the other Mahogany.
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Old 06-03-2017, 09:50 AM   #26
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The wood on an electric guitar isn't vibrating and the pickups don't pick up vibrations from the wood anyway on an electric.

The type of pick ups and scale and strings do affect the tone of course.
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Old 06-03-2017, 02:14 PM   #27
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On an acoustic the wood plays significant role in the sound. It's something that's pretty easy to hear, IMO. On an electric, the wood might make some difference but I can't hear it. That includes various guitar finishes and the various neck and fretboard materials. Sustain is a more complex issue. A Les Paul seems to sustain a note much longer Stratocaster or a Tele but the designs are vastly different, so IDK what effect the wood has.

I've never seen any objective tests on this issue but mostly I don't care. How a specific guitar sounds to me is all that matters.

As far as good tone vs bad tone, how we do even start to define that. It's totally subjective. Thinking back to the original designers, most of us are abusing the equipment and producing tones they would have considered noise
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Old 06-03-2017, 10:34 PM   #28
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On an acoustic guitar the wood plays significant role in the sound of guitar. It something that's pretty easy to hear, IMO. On an electric, the wood might make some difference but I can't hear it. That includes various guitar finishes and the various neck and fretboard materials. Sustain is a more complex issue. A Les Paul seems to sustain a note much longer Stratocaster or a Tele but the designs are vastly different, so IDK what effect the wood has.

I've never seen any objective tests on this issue but mostly I don't care. How a specific guitar sounds to me is all that matters.

As far as good tone vs bad tone, how do even start to define that. It's totally subjective. Thinking back to the original designers, most of are abusing the equipment and producing tones they would have considered noise
I think it's what we get into our heads. In the 60's the Beatles had a couple of Epiphone Casinos and I believe both George and John had all the finished sanded off of them and had made statements that it improved the sound. But yet after a period of time passed, maybe ten years or so I believe that they had them restored back again. Just don't see how it could affect an electric but if you "think" it does, then I guess it does.
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Old 06-08-2017, 05:19 AM   #29
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It depends. On an acoustic guitar, most definitely.

On an electric, yes and no. On a solid body, I doubt that the wood has any effect at all. On a semi-hallow body, that would be more open to interpretation.
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Old 06-21-2017, 10:50 AM   #30
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For what its worth, I'm going to pass along a story about a fellow named GIBSON who made Mandolins for a living. A bunch of people who thought they knew more about Mandolins than he did were saying that the back of the Mandolin had to be made of a tone wood just like the top was made from a tone wood. This Gibson fellow, who later built guitars for a living, decided to shut them all up and he built a really nice Mandolin with a really nice close grained Spruce top and a Paper Mache' body. The folks who knew more than he did played it and loved it. Then he told them what the back was made of. Yes, the top is very critical about strength, flexibility, and resonance and should be constructed of a good tone wood.
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