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Old 10-08-2017, 01:48 PM   #11
Jase
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Originally Posted by PKVeazey View Post
I use a Dremel tool with Jewelers rouge on a buffing pad. If you use a Dremel tool, be careful to stay off the fretboard. If you use a radius sanding block, you are limited to that radius only and certainly can't use it on a Compound Radius neck. I use 3 different grits on my sanding sponges. Medium, Fine, and Very Fine. I get them from Lowe's or Home Depot for about $3. The sanding sponge form fits any radius and lets you feel what you are doing. It also closes the grain of the fret board and makes it much smoother. If its a Maple neck, you can't close the grain. Then you'll have to mask the frets to protect the clear finish from the sanding sponges. I put masking tape along beside the neck at the body to protect the body finish from the leveling file and the sanding sponges. ALL guitar tech work must be done with great care. Don't allow yourself to rush or be distracted.
Ive always wanted a good dremel tool, but the original brand is expensive. Just on ebay now looking at soldering irons, but not sure about wattage. Im going to take my time with it. Ive been wanting to do a fretjob on this tele for over a year, and swap out the pups out for longer.

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Originally Posted by Tony Done View Post
No, but that is being a bit lazy.

Those masks are good insurance when using a dremel. I use one for buffing, a thick, hard leather disk with polishing compound, the white grade, whatever that is.
Do you have the dremel brand?. Ive seen some cheaper non branded models.
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Old 10-08-2017, 08:28 PM   #12
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Mine is a Chinese made Dremel. I had to send it back for warranty repairs after a few weeks, and the bearings are going after a few months use. My impression is that quality has been deteriorating in steps since I first bought one about 30 years ago. - Their life expectancy has been getting shorter. I might try a different make next time.
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Old 10-08-2017, 09:17 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Tony Done View Post
No, but that is being a bit lazy.

Those masks are good insurance when using a dremel. I use one for buffing, a thick, hard leather disk with polishing compound, the white grade, whatever that is.
The white stuff is usually Tripoli or tin oxide. It works just as well as the jewelers rouge but can leave white residue next to the fretwire.
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Old 10-08-2017, 10:25 PM   #14
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The white stuff is usually Tripoli or tin oxide. It works just as well as the jewelers rouge but can leave white residue next to the fretwire.
It's the stuff that comes from industrial suppliers in blocks that look like a gold ingot, and they are colour-coded by grade. White is a fairly gentle option.
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Old 10-08-2017, 10:50 PM   #15
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Wouldn't brasso or T-cut do the same job both being used for metal polishing?.
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Old 10-08-2017, 11:07 PM   #16
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I've used Silvo and Brasso for metal polishing, no problem, it is just that a paste or block type is a bit more user-friendly. I've also used Silvo for polishing guitar finishes, but Brasso leaves a slight fog. My favourite general purpose one for both lacquer and metal is a local one, Ferro "Reflection".
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Old 10-08-2017, 11:42 PM   #17
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Wouldn't brasso or T-cut do the same job both being used for metal polishing?.
Brasso is fine a grained Pumice(volcanic dust) mixed with a strong solvent. The pumice is OK but that solvent is not a good idea on a guitar. If I didn't have anything else to use, I'd use it but I'd be really careful with it.
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